This Week in Review – 11/13/2015

This Week in Review

We thought we’d keep it nice and simple this week, so without further adieu, this week in review:

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This week we posted:

  1. Whatever Happened to Booth Tarkington?
  2. A Pairing: Leonardo Da Vinci + Ross Gay
  3. The Pulitzer Project: The Magnificent Ambersons
  4. Manhattan Beach, California

This weekend, I am going on a class field trip to the Neue, a friend’s spacewarming at her new office, and watching Alabama Football. I hope you stomp in some leaves and drink some apple cider. It finally feels like Autumn in New York!

This Week in Review – 11/6/2015

This Week in Review

hot and hot shrimp and grits

women of the hour lena dunham

  • As I’m reading The Magnificent Ambersons, I’ve been absolutely befuddled as to how Booth Tarkington could win two Pulitzers and then basically disappear from history. The Atlantic does a great piece on this.

One finds no mention of Tarkington in The Oxford Book of American Literary Anecdotes, let alone in the diaries and letters of his fellow Princetonian Edmund Wilson. Another alumnus, F. Scott Fitzgerald, had Tarkington in mind when he expressed his fear of lapsing into a condition that would render him uninterested in anything but “colored people, children, and dogs.”

  • And finally, a few of my favorite new songs to tide you over this weekend:


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This week, we posted:

  1. A Pairing: Francis Bacon + Sharon Olds
  2. Books I Read in October
  3. Book Review: The Time Garden, Daria Song
  4. The Magnificent Ambersons – Vocabulary

I hope you have a marvelously warm and cozy weekend!

This Week in Review – 10/30/2015

This Week in Review

Hi Boys & Girls, can you believe it’s almost November? Don’t forget to set your clocks back an hour this Sunday! In honor of National Cat Day, here are a few of my favorite cat-related art works.

My-Wifes-Lovers

Carl Kahler, My Wife’s Lovers (1891)

In 1891 Mrs Kate Johnson, possibly America’s greatest cat enthusiast, commissioned artist Carl Kahler to paint a portrait of some of her 350 cats who all lived in great luxury in her California home. (from Sotheby’s)

If you’re not sure what to do this weekend in New York, check out the Museum of the Moving Image’s exhibit How Cats Took Over the Internet.

cat with kittens

Cat with Kittens, maybe from Egypt, circa 664-30 BCE

Or there is always the Brooklyn Museum’s Divine Felines: Cats from Ancient Egypt exhibit.

susan herbert

Susan Herbert, Baroness Rothschild (2001)

Susan Herbert may be one of my new favorite artists. I’ll have to learn more about her and share it with you soon!

koons

Jeff Koons, Cat on a Clothesline (1994–2001).

And no cat painting collection would be complete without a nod to Jeff Koons!

What are some other cat paintings that I should know about? Hope you have a spooky Halloween!

This Week in Review – 10/23/2015

This Week in Review

gabriel-garcia-marquez-fidel-castro

flannery

“When I first uncrated these birds, in my frenzy I said ‘I want so many of them that every time I go out the door, I’ll run into one,’” O’Connor wrote in her essay “The King of Birds.” It was not long before she got her wish. Andalusia, then a working dairy farm crowded by cattle and farmhands, was soon dotted by dozens of peacocks.

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This week, we posted:

This weekend, I’ll be re-reading The Magicians, watching a lot of television and working on a paper for class. Wherever you are, I hope you have lots of candy, warm socks, and a comfortable couch!

California Bound!

hollywood

Hi Everyone, I’ll be going to Los Angeles to hang out with Kimberly for almost a whole week! We will be taking in some sights, living out our Masterchef dreams, and watching some questionable movies.

LOS ANGELES - OCTOBER 28: The East Pavilion at the Getty Center is seen on October 28, 2005 in Los Angeles, California. The J. Paul Getty Museum's recently departed antiquities curator, Marion True, is facing trial next month in Rome over allegations that she knowingly received dozens of stolen items. Also, reportedly, Greece has renewed a claim that some items were stolen as well and should be returned. The allegations could not only cost the museum its reputation, but some of its prized possessions of Roman, Greek and Etruscan works. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

I haven’t really talked about anything beyond books and the occasional movie on this blog, but I think I might try sharing more about my daily activities, what do you think?

Since I will be on a plane tomorrow, I thought I’d share some links today to tide you over until the next This Week in Review.

That’s all for now, I’m excited to share my adventures with you when I get back! I hope you stay warm, drink a lot of coffee, and snuggle up with a good book or television show this weekend.

This Week in Review – 10/02/2015

This Week in Review

"Les Belles Danses" (The beautiful dances) by French artist Jean-Michel Othoniel, one of the three fountain sculptures installed at the Water Theatre Grove in Versailles outside Paris, France,  Tuesday, May 12, 2015. Designed by Andre Le Notre between 1671 and 1674, this grove is located in the gardens of the Palace of Versailles. Following an international competition aimed at garden designers for the restoration of the Water Theatre grove, the landscape designer Louis Benech and the artist Jean-Michel Othoniel were chosen for their contemporary art project. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

“Les Belles Danses” (The beautiful dances) by French artist Jean-Michel Othoniel

“In the United States we throw away around 40% of what we produce; and globally, 28% of the land under cultivation grows food that ends up in landfills.”

cool beans!

tweet

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This week, we posted:

  1. Book Review: Modern Romance, Aziz Ansari
  2. Book Review: Room, Emma Donoghue
  3. A Pairing: Edward Hopper + Dorianne Laux
  4. Books I Read in September

What did you discover this week? I hope those of you on the East Coast stay warm and dry this weekend!

This Week in Review – 09/11/2015

This Week in Review

Today is an inauspicious day in America, and so I thought I would share a serious list today about current events: politics, the refugee crisis, and other important things that I am trying to learn more about in the process of becoming a better global citizen.

syria

The Medal “honors those who have widened the public’s engagement with literature and ‘deepened the nation’s understanding of the human experience’.”

I don’t know what to make of the term “immigrant fiction.” Writers have always tended to write about the worlds they come from. And it just so happens that many writers originate from different parts of the world than the ones they end up living in, either by choice or by necessity or by circumstance, and therefore, write about those experiences. If certain books are to be termed immigrant fiction, what do we call the rest? Native fiction? Puritan fiction? This distinction doesn’t agree with me. Given the history of the United States, all American fiction could be classified as immigrant fiction. Hawthorne writes about immigrants. So does Willa Cather. From the beginnings of literature, poets and writers have based their narratives on crossing borders, on wandering, on exile, on encounters beyond the familiar. The stranger is an archetype in epic poetry, in novels. The tension between alienation and assimilation has always been a basic theme.

Listy-Hangar-Dunlap-1-jumbo-v7

Wherever you are today, I hope you are surrounded by friends, puppies, or pizza! I will be in the library reading for school, so please eat a slice of pizza for me!