This Week in Review – 09/11/2015

This Week in Review

Today is an inauspicious day in America, and so I thought I would share a serious list today about current events: politics, the refugee crisis, and other important things that I am trying to learn more about in the process of becoming a better global citizen.

syria

The Medal “honors those who have widened the public’s engagement with literature and ‘deepened the nation’s understanding of the human experience’.”

I don’t know what to make of the term “immigrant fiction.” Writers have always tended to write about the worlds they come from. And it just so happens that many writers originate from different parts of the world than the ones they end up living in, either by choice or by necessity or by circumstance, and therefore, write about those experiences. If certain books are to be termed immigrant fiction, what do we call the rest? Native fiction? Puritan fiction? This distinction doesn’t agree with me. Given the history of the United States, all American fiction could be classified as immigrant fiction. Hawthorne writes about immigrants. So does Willa Cather. From the beginnings of literature, poets and writers have based their narratives on crossing borders, on wandering, on exile, on encounters beyond the familiar. The stranger is an archetype in epic poetry, in novels. The tension between alienation and assimilation has always been a basic theme.

Listy-Hangar-Dunlap-1-jumbo-v7

Wherever you are today, I hope you are surrounded by friends, puppies, or pizza! I will be in the library reading for school, so please eat a slice of pizza for me!

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This Week in Review – 08/07/2015

This Week in Review

Hello, August! The weather has been superb here in New York, and I have been spending all of my free time out and about. We have been trying to become more politically aware, especially with the upcoming elections. Here are some things that we’ve been reading this week.

Politics:

Jefferson believed that Natives should give up their own cultures, religions, and lifestyles to assimilate to western European culture and a European-style agriculture, which was more efficient.

Jeb Bush met up with his brother George to play a friendly game of Ping-Pong. When Jeb hit the ball, he would say “Jeb,” and when George hit the ball, he would also say “Jeb.” After Jeb explained to George that he should, in fact, be saying “George,” they laughed, posed for a photo, and said “Bush.”

Just for fun:

this ring is not nearly big enough to make up for your face

this ring is
not nearly big enough to make up for your face

hedgehog life

This week, we posted:

This weekend, I am celebrating a friend’s birthday, reading a really depressing book, and hopefully watching Fantastic Four. Wherever you are, I hope you have a good book and a great snack! What are your plans?

Book Review: Speak Now – Marriage Equality on Trial

Speak Now

I may not have mentioned this before, but I’m currently in law school. I’m in a four year evening program, because I work during the day, and I’m about to enter my third year of school this fall. Entering law school with little to no idea about the legal process or jargon was a struggle. Reading 10 pages for class could take me up to two hours, because I was constantly stopping to look up Latin words or legal procedures. Things have become a lot easier these days, and I even started – dare I say it? – to read books about famous cases for fun! Most recently, I picked up Speak Now: Marriage Equality on Trial which tells the story of the now famous California Proposition 8 case.

In the wake of the Supreme Court’s most recent decision in Obergefell v. Hodges last month, I thought I should brush up on the legal history of the gay rights movement. This book is still relevant today, even though the Supreme Court has since ruled for same sex marriage in all fifty states.

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