This Week in Review – 11/6/2015

This Week in Review

hot and hot shrimp and grits

women of the hour lena dunham

  • As I’m reading The Magnificent Ambersons, I’ve been absolutely befuddled as to how Booth Tarkington could win two Pulitzers and then basically disappear from history. The Atlantic does a great piece on this.

One finds no mention of Tarkington in The Oxford Book of American Literary Anecdotes, let alone in the diaries and letters of his fellow Princetonian Edmund Wilson. Another alumnus, F. Scott Fitzgerald, had Tarkington in mind when he expressed his fear of lapsing into a condition that would render him uninterested in anything but “colored people, children, and dogs.”

  • And finally, a few of my favorite new songs to tide you over this weekend:


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This week, we posted:

  1. A Pairing: Francis Bacon + Sharon Olds
  2. Books I Read in October
  3. Book Review: The Time Garden, Daria Song
  4. The Magnificent Ambersons – Vocabulary

I hope you have a marvelously warm and cozy weekend!

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This Week in Review – 7/24/2015

This Week in Review

If you haven’t noticed, Kimberly is out on vacation this week, so I’ve been trying to hold down the fort without her! I’ve broken down this week into two categories for you. It’s short and sweet – Art & Fun!

Art:

Fun:

This week, we posted:

This weekend, I’ll be going to brunch with the Bloody Mary Club, an outdoor concert, and stopping by the Guggenheim. What are your plans?

A Reading – Devendra Banhart – 6/25/2015

I Left My Noodle on Ramen Street
This post is a little late, but it’s better late than never, I suppose. Devendra Banhart released an art book recently called “I Left My Noodle on Ramen Street.” He stopped by The Strand on 6/25/15 to chat about art, music, and his new book in a conversation with his friend Adam Green, of The Moldy Peaches fame. The book is a lovely combination of art, essays, photography, and doodles.

rejoicing in the hands

Devendra said that he wanted the book to be purely art, but the publisher wanted a more intimate and personal book. The result is that the book seems almost like an art-journal. As you may know, Devendra draws and designs all of his own album covers. The book is filled with a lot of tiny, meticulous drawings that we have all grown to love and recognize. He said that this book is the kind of music that he would like to create, and flipping through the book, it’s fascinating to see into how Devendra’s mind works and how intricately connected music and art are to him.

Sphinx Devendra talked about his attempts to get an art show in a gallery and how he was rejected by all the art galleries. The frustration of this led to a series of drawings that are referred to as Sphinxes. These are permutations of different things filling up an empty space, his art-gallery surrogate. It is little stories and details like this that really help you understand what you’re looking at. Hearing him speak added another dimension of understanding to his art, music, and this book. It was really lovely and magical to be able to attend the reading.

self-portrait banhart

I would really only recommend this book to Devendra-devotees; if you are a fan of his music and music videos, you are going to love this book. There is so much to look at and to learn! If you think Devendra is a weird and radical hippie, then you will probably find this book a waste of money and time. I’ve put together a little playlist for you to listen to while flipping through the book, doodling on your own, or just to lay on the rug and listen to with your eyes closed. Enjoy!

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Additional Resources:

This Week in Review – 06/12/2015

Capture

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For some fun weekend e-window shopping,

Finally, I’ll leave you with a music video.

This weekend, I’m planning on pulling out my watercolors, making a new collage, and checking out some new (to me) museums. What about you?